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on that and say it's already here. so the idea that we should wait for the science to get better, i think, is just, it's too late for that. so the cat is already out of the bag. the question is what do you do now that it's in the courtroom. well, we have dualing experts. we have judges sitting in a gate keeping role who have to decide whether or not the evidence should be admissible and whether it should be permitted in a case. my view is that the more evidence that we can provide to a scrr or to a judge -- jury or to a judge in their decision makings, some objective evidence, some evidence to bolster things like a diagnosis of schizophrenia or i.q., all the better. at the same time we need the critics in the courtroom explaining the shortcomings of the science so that we don't have false evidence that is introduced or undue reliance on science that isn't quite there yet. my preference is recognize it's already there, but make sure that we have robust discussions about the validity of the science before people buy into it too much. >> yeah, i would just add that i basically agree that it's already
that you have to ask the question from the legal system and from the science perspective as to what free will might mean. on the science side, the question really is, and this is what we were debating, is the question whether you can operationally define free will so you can measure it? from a scientist's standpoint, a construct doesn't really mean anything if you can't measure it. i have been asked many, many newer scientists including ken, what exactly does free will mean and how do you measure it? it could be like emotional control. it could be something like impulsivity, impulse control and you get back to the basic problem that chris who is a colleague of anita's at vanderbilt, wait he has put it, how do you distinguish and irresistible impulse from an impulse not resisted. there is a basic gray area, a difficult ability to say, did you actually choose that and did you choose it in a way that the law would recognize. so the law all of the time develops concepts that scientists are interested in studying. it might be competency, for example. well, competency is really a multifaceted
. >>> and the right wingers and science don't mix. we're going to do the "politicsnation" science lab. you don't want to miss this. ♪ ♪music plays this vacation... has been a year in the planning. and here you are.. standing... nay... staring down your dreams. the rest of your holiday hinges on the moment you walk through that door. the door opens.. ...you hold your breath... and then you realize... you got it right! you got it booking right. because it doesn't get any better than this. it doesn't get any booking better than this. look at the view. look at the booking view. this is exactly what you booking needed. bask in the booking glory... at over a quarter million properties. planet earth's #1 accommodation site booking.com booking.yeah behind the silver of philadelphia cream cheese. it always begins with fresh, local milk, blended with real wholesome cream. going fresh from the farm, to our fridge, in just six days. because we believe in fresh taste. that's the way we set the standard for intensely rich, luscious flavor. so our story of fresh taste always ends... deliciously. when it comes t
grade science class. what we've got is our standard little earth worm and i think the reason that this person got their video camera rolls washgs this earth worm seems to have translucent skin. in fact, it seems as though you can see blood circulating through its dorsal vessel. >> ooh. >> my goodness. >> this is very seventh grade science. i can smell that weird formaldehyde smell always in your science class. >> count you feel you're going to pin this worm down and start dissecting it? >> yeah, but you can see blood traveling back and forth? >> they do have blood. this is the dorsal vessel you're seeing and we're just watching the blood circulate. >> looks like little bolts of electricity going back and forth. >> it doesn't look real. >> it doesn't. >> shot by kim and so amazed by what he was seeing he thought, why not? >> looks like we're seeing an x-ray without x-ray goggles. >>> this video is so full of fail it's hard to keep track of them all. in brazil. we start with a jeep that swamped himself in the water. looks like he was trying to maybe run across the beach and wen
to many could. stem cell science. watching a man own heart tissue beat outside the body. what it means for all of us. plus the wife of man who hid out for more than two days to survive the hostage crisis in algeria speaks in and out exclusive interview with abc news. >> and insanity defense is not unique but this is sure different. man charmed with the murder of 3 co-workers pwlaiments on his childhood in pwlaiments on his childhood in china. get well, well, well. growing up, we didn't have u-verse. we couldn't record four shows at the same time. in my day, you were lucky if you could record two shows. and if mom was recording her dumb show and dad was recording his dumb show then, by george, that's all we watched. and we liked it! today's kids got it so good. [ male announcer ] get u-verse tv with a total home dvr included free for life. only $29 a month for six months. rethink possible. >> good evening again. we begin this half hour with new video out of algeria showing hostages huddled together held cabtive by -- captive held by al qaeda more americans than we previously knew h
promised action on climate change. ktvu's health and science editor john fowler joins us now live in foster city with reaction and the reality. john? >> reporter: indeed it is beautiful here tonight at center park but experts tell me do nothing and today's children will inherit a changed world. >> reporter: foster city could be at the bottom of the bay as seas rise from climate change, water, food and civilization disrupted. >> we will respond to the threat of climate change knowing the failure to do so would betray our children. >> reporter: he devoted a minute to climate change. it was more than in the reelection campaign so it was a welcome surprise. >> reporter: he notes climate and energy reform failed three years ago when democrats controlled congress. >> it is hard to imagine this congress really approving aggressive legislation on the climate issue. >> people notice global changes and controlling carbon emissions are so important citizens should speak up. >> voice opinion so our congressmen will push for it. >> if everybody does a little bit it could be done. i am not sure you could
's not on the rise and neither is cyber bullying and the top scholars in the country and in social science and psychology that saying that, so that's an important distinction so thank you both so much. >> and there is that and -- there's a balance between -- i mean when i hear that bullying is going down i mean all of us should rejoice because that to me is indicative of the fact of the work in communities across the country are starting to pay off, but it's going to be hard in this ark and we are in this area and people are coming forward, kids are coming forward . suicides that would have been kept forward or not reporting and we're learning thanks to rapid fire and thanks to social networking or facebook and this is a sued -- all of this the -- the volume of bullying is going to rise in proportion with i think the actual drop in occurrences so to balance that and be aware of that i think is important. >>i totally agree, and that's really to rosylyn's point about this being a very, very important moment and we need to did it right. just on the subject of suicide the surgeon general cam
co-author who is professor of political science at harvard. many years ago when we repose at princeton university, we co-taught a course at the public policy and that led to his co-authored several books on deliberation and democracy. >> host: in the spirit of compromise, you get to vegetative examples. 1986 tax reform health care act. if you work, walk us through this. >> guest: this is a tale of two compromises and begins with ronald reagan presidency, where tax reform was a hugely important issue and hugely difficult issue to get done between republicans and democrats. those of us who lived through the reagan era's recognize that people thought they were very polarized. tip o'neill was a staunch liberal democrat. ronald reagan's staunch republican. yes, they crafted a bipartisan compromise with bradley dan rostenkowski bob packwood being part of the movers of this compromise. password to the affordable care act. it is arguably even more difficult to craft a compromise within one party, the democratic party because of the permanent campaign and how not just polarized, bu
award. during school time i like learning math and science, because my teacher uses chinese to explain. if the teachers didn't teach my cousins and my sisters and me how to speak chinese, we wouldn't be able to speak in restaurants. once again, thank you. [applause] [speaking foreign language] >> good evening, everyone, i am winnie chi, i am the body president of alice fong yu, this is like a second home to me. the teachers and my friends support me and they make me feel special. and also staff members and teachers guarantee that we have a safe environment to learn. and they make us feel comfortable and safe to share our feelings. i enjoy math and science, because the teachers teach us in chinese. and they teach us step by step. i am proud to be a student at alice fong yu. thank you. [speaking foreign language] [applause] >> hello, everyone, i am maze. i a seventh grader at alice fong yu, and i am peer mediator. afy is an amazing school. the chinese i learned there has been helpful in so many situations. if not for me being able to speak chinese, i would not be able to communicate with
want to wear your lunch. on your sleeve. [ laughter ] and don't think science is gonna come to the rescue. >> british researchers have created a projectile vomitting robot that mimics the symptoms of norovirus. resereachers created the projectile robot to test how far the dangerous contagion spreads everytime someone throws up. >> stephen: because if you want to study vomit spray patterns, you have two options: build a robot that pukes, or ride the subway after 2:00 am. [ laughter ] which brings me threat number 3: vomiting robots. [ laughter ] really, science? you know we haven't cured cancer yet, right? [ laughter ] you might want to put some of this energy into that. because once our robots are womiting, who's going to clean up after my roomba? [ laughter ] my other roomba? it'll start puking when it sees the first one blow chunks. [ laughter ] on the plus side, we finally have a robot the japanese won't want to have sex with. [ laughter ] but they should, because... >> new strains of drug restistant gonorrhea have spread to countries around the world. >> gonorrhea is beg
issues. gang violence and brain science and crime, these are issues at the forefront and deserve all of our attention. this is a greatat>> your going p with me because i liked to wander around and see faces. you have learned more about me that a lot of people know. for the last 10 years i have been married to someone who was a deputy chief of the lapd and i now refer to him as being in recovery. at the same time, i have been working extensively with home with industries, and my brother said, if he had dreamed i would be married to a policeman and working with a priest, somebody would be lying. i have been working with gangs and been involved with gangs, trying to figure them out for 34 years. i began as a young social worker in south los angeles. with gang infested housing projects that are now almost mythic, jordan downs and nickerson gardens, and i worked in these projects during what is referred to as the decade of death, when crack and unregulated gun availability laid waste to communities of color. in los angeles during the late 1980's and early 1990's, there were 1000 homicides
change and the announcement of science deniers was lauded by the left. of course it had to be. let's listen to the president say something that i don't think has been said before. >> we, the people, still believe that our obligations as americans are not just to the ourselves but to all posterity. we will respond to the threat of climate change knowing that the failure to do so would betray our children and future generations. some may still deny the overwhelming judgment of science, but none can avoid the devastating impact of raging fires and crippling drought and more powerful storms. the path towards sustainable energy sources will be long and sometimes difficult, but america cannot resist this transition. we must lead it. >> well, rush limbaugh challenged him today because people were listening to rush are driving cars and using up fossil fuel and they're not driving smart cars or priuses. no, they're driving big gas burners, but the fact is there's still that sort of no-nothingism, if you will, that -- i'm trying to think of the great word. you don't believe in anything. ludd
with a science-type -- as somebody with a science-type background i took offense at that. i would challenge him to show us the linkage, the undeniable linkage between drought and change of weather and some kind of human activity. >> it's not like you're an m.i.t. graduate. oh, wait, you are. i think it was a message, not to congress but to whoever will be running the e.p.a. for the president. i don't see any of that language passing through the house and so it'll be via rule and reg, executive order potentially through the white house. the m.i.t. grad does bring up the science today as we sit on the 40th anniversary of roe v. wade, i find it amazing that the unmistakable scientific and biological evidence of the humanity of a -- an unborn child is denied by the white house while we have this debate over other science as well. >> clear think the administration likes to use regulatory agencies as a bludgeon to play to his constituencies. if the leadership wants to make sure i would vote for this debt ceiling increase, they could achieve the rains act to it, which my predecessor geoff davis got pa
return. >> obama: some may still deny the overwhelming science but no one can avoid the raging fires, crippling drought and more powerful storms. they don't know it yet but they're gonna fall in love get married, have a couple of kids, [ children laughing ] move to the country, and live a long, happy life together where they almost never fight about money. [ dog barks ] because right after they get married they'll find some retirement people who are paid on salary not commission. they'll get straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. [ voice of dennis ] allstate. with accident forgiveness, they guarantee your rates won't go up just because of an accident. smart kid. [ voice of dennis ] indeed. are you in good hands? we have a big big hour and the iq will go way up. (vo) current tv gets the converstion started weekdays at 9am eastern. >> i'm a slutty bob hope. >> you are. >> the troops love me. (vo) tv and radio talk show h
a point? >> well, i think they definitely a point, neil. economics is a very dynamic social science. there is a latin phrase that means, all things being the same. the democratic policy approach is everything's the same. we can increase tax rateses or in france, we can increase them to 75% and everything else will be the same. but that's not how it works. it's a very dynamic world, where incentives mean something and punishments mean something. so when someone says, we are going to take in california, as mickelson said, we are going to be taking 60-odd percent of your income, or in france, the state's taking 75% of your income, people with the means to move will say, there has to be a place that would be happier to have me and would not -- >> neil: that has been nevada for a lot of californians. there has been a money flight from california for sometime now. mickelson put a face to it. he has dialed that back, checking in with sponsors who didn't share that view. or maybe he wasn't supposed to. but he dialed it back. and sarkozy has his own tax issues and there may be more to the st
our children and future generations. some may still deny the overwhelming judgment of science, but none can avoid the devastating impact of raging firesser and crippling drought and more powerful storms. >> michael: but will policy follow words this time? will mitigating the effects of climate change be a hallmark of president obama's second term? he did say climate change. joining me now to discuss the progressives reaction to president obama's speech is donny fowler, uea graduate. he runs his own political firm here. donny as always great to have you back inside "the war room." before we get into the nitty-gritty, what did you think of the president's speech. >> it was great. president obama has learned a lot of lessons about being in washington, d.c. you have to stand up, say what you want and fight hard for it. you can't sit back and wait for them to come to you. >> michael: i hear and i agree. i thought it was fantastic speech. >> it wasn't a liberal speech. we'll tax any estates over $1 million. we're going to put a carbon tax on any carbon. we're going to legalized drug
of sciences, the garden was designed by the california spring blossom and wildfilower association. here is a truly enchanting and tranquil garden along a path behind a charming gate. this garden is the spot to woo your date. stroll around and appreciate its unique setting. the gorgeous brick walkway and a brick wall, the stone benches, the rustic sundial. chaired the part -- share the bard's word hundred famous verses from a shakespearean plays. this is a gem to share with someone special. pack a picnic, find a bench, and enjoy the sunshine, and let the whimsical words of william shakespeare and floats you and your loved one away. this is one of the most popular wedding locations and is available for reservations. take a bus and have no parking worries. shakespeares' garden is ada accessible. located at the bottom of this hill, it is a secret garden with an infinite in captivating appeal. carefully tucked away, it makes the top of our list for most intimate pyknic setting. avoid all taurus cars and hassles by taking a cable car. or the 30, 45, or 91 bus. the garden was designed by thoma
of fascism or communism with muskets and militias. no single person can train all the math and science teachers we'll need to equip our children for the future, or build the roads and networks and research labs that will bring new jobs and businesses to our shores. now, more than ever, we must do these things together, as one nation and one people. (applause) this generation of americans has been tested by crises that steeled our resolve and proved our resilience. a decade of war is now ending. (applause) an economic recovery has begun.(applause) america's possibilities are limitless, for we possess all the qualities that this world without boundaries demands: youth and drive; diversity and openness; an endless capacity for risk and a gift for reinvention. my fellow americans, we are made for this moment, and we will seize it -- so long as we seize it together. (applause) for we, the people, understand that our country cannot succeed when a shrinking few do very well and a growing many barely make it. (applause) we believe that america's prosperity must rest upon the broad shoulders o
of science, but none can avoid the devastating impact of raging fires and crippling drought and more powerful storms >> ifill: the calls to action drew cheers from the hundreds of thousands of well wishers on the national mall and from most democrats. but republicans complained of a defiant tone and a sharply left ward turn, noting, for example, that the president has mentioned the deficit just once. the super pac cross roads g.p.s. unveiled a web video citing news accounts of the speech. >> the progressive liberal agenda is what he's now clearly staking his second term on. >> ifill: and at the capital today, republican senate minority leader mitch mcconnell joined the criticism >> one thing that pretty clear from the president's speech yesterday, the era of liberalism is back. unabashedly far left of center inauguration speech certainly brings back memories of the democratic party of ages past. if the president pursues that kind of agenda, obviously it's not designed to bring us together and certainly not designed to deal with the transcendent issue of our era which is deficit and debt. unti
. >> no single person can train all the math and science teachers we'll need to equip our children for the future. or build the roads and networks and research labs that will bring new jobs and businesses to our shores. now, more than ever, we must do these things together as one nation and one people. >> obama begins his second term with several battles looming. he'll try to work with republicans in the house of representatives to revamp gun control laws and avoid defaulting on the national debt. ♪ the rockets red glare ♪ the bombs bursting in air >> pop star beyonce sang the national anthem. her performance capped off the official proceedings ahead of the inaugural parade. then the president walked the capitol route from the building to the white house. the inauguration four years ago drew almost 2 million people. this time an estimated 475,000 turned out. >>> prime minister abdelmalek sellal says 37 foreign hostages have been confirmed dead in the eastern city of in amenas. sellal said the victims were from at least eight countries. most of the terrorists were militants from east algeria o
'm here representing not galileo anymore, but -- galileo academy of science and technology. we are so very proud of you today. wherever you go, let the young people know from -- to city hall, that you have arrived today. let them know where you went to school today so they can have hope. my younger sisters, cohen, kim, you're always there. where's the opera house? we thank you. hbcu. that makes my heart happy. this commissioners would not be sitting here today, former commissioner mar, former commissioner jane kim, now supervisor. former commissioner norman yee. no supervisor. you give our people hope. i will say that malia cohen, would be the next president of the board of supervisors. supervisor kennedy and doris ward, they showed you what to do. good luck and god bless each of you. >> my name is michael -- i want to say welcome to the class of 2013. congratulations for making yourself available and here at city hall. second, i want to point out that two of the nominees need to have a legislative aide if they will be board president, if malia cohen and jane jim would need a third le
rainforest. rebecca said, we don't always know what creates social change. it takes everything from science to faith. it is that fertile place right in the middle we really exceptional campaigning happens. and that is why i strive to be. i would like to do this in memoriam. may she rest in peace. the next item, a number of you have heard about. that is, a charter amendment that i am introducing today that is get the six votes we'll put a measure on the ballot before the voters of the city and county of san francisco to give the opportunity to rename our airport the harvey milk san francisco international airport. a lot of has been said about the renaming of the airport. the one thing i'm committed to is to make sure that we have an open and transparent process. all of us as individuals, whether we think about it or not, have a special relationship with our city's airport. while it is important for me, and this approach was to make sure that whatever happened, at the end of the day we gave the voters of the city and county of san francisco, the ultimate say. i would like to thank my colleag
coca-cola, the center for science in the public interest, say that the healthy name "vitaminwater" , small amount of vitamin contet and obscures the product's 33 grams of sugar which is almost as much as a can of coke. though, according a recent 1905 study, is a delightful, palatable and hetful beverage. the chief litigator stephen gardner went so far as to claim the coca-cola company added vitamins to crap? added vitamins to crap? that is slanderous, coca-cola must countersue and give me a call because i just got a great idea for energy bars. [ r ]ter ] [cheers and applause] >> stephen: welcome back, everybody. [cheers and applause] my guest tonight is a talkshow host who thinks he knows what's best for america. sorry, that job's taken. please welcome piers morgan. [cheers and applause] good to see you again. >> good to to see you. >> stephen: how are you? >> very good, thank you. >> stephen: thank you for coming on. i'm a big fan of the show and i mean this in the most respectful way possible get (bleep) out of town. [ laughter ] okay? no, no after the interview. >> okay. >> ste
the overwhelming judgment of science, but none can avoid the devastating impact of raging fires and crippling drought, and more powerful storms. >> it is interesting that he includes the denial of science in there. that almost makes it a partisan comment, now. >> yes, you know if you would have read his speech or listened to his speech four years ago you would think the biggest problem facing the globe was partisanship and people arguing with each other in washington. that was the thing he was going to come in and fix. now he is actually talking about something real that actually is a major threat. and he is doing it in an idealogical way, saying you have to believe in something, and do things together to solve this problem. all the way, he is smacking p i people around, smacking around paul ryan, by employing his own "takers receipt righetorrhetori >> we recognize that no matter how responsibly we live our lives, anyone of us in our time could face a sudden job loss, or illness, or a home sweat away in a terrible storm. the commitments we make to each other, through medicare and medicaid and
. the evidence is in. as he said, the science is in. 30, 40 years ago, the fact that he took an inaugural speech and used that kind of time and talked about climate is important and just making seneca and selma and stonewall all in the same sentence, it will be repeated over and over again as part of the traditions of american rights and civil rights. >> that was really something. to hear him mention stonewall in the first statements, certainly for gay and lesbian americans, that was a stunning leap forward. >> gigantic. he connected it all to the patriots of 1776. that we keep widening in our democracy. he made those places almost like battlefield spots. like oxford, mississippi or normandy or iwo jima. it's an iconic speech. >> i was going to say time and again when presidents have come here, when they've cited heroes, they've been military heroes. to talk about seneca falls and selma is more about an inclusive america with an emphasis on the equality of opportunity. not upon liberty. a republican would have traditionally given a speech about liberty. >> stonewall was the group of people most
. [laughter] yeah. around--yeah. okay. yeah. that's good. it's for science. [laughter] do it again. [makes sounds] [laughter] black and white. then 10 years later, in 1984, my good friends dave vasquez and craig dawson came into my classroom and videotaped the course again. and 12 of those ended up as the tapes distributed by addison-wesley. one of those, i would like to show you now, features my good friend paul robinson, who turns out to be the author of the laboratory manual to the conceptual physics program. let's drop in in that class. don't touch it now. don't touch it now. okay. you'll be harmed less if you touch it now. you can trust me. okay. here? okay, right there. that's right on. yeah. [laughter] oh, that's beautiful. stay holding it. okay. look this way. yeah, that's nice. oh, that is nice. that's fantastic. look, look, look, look. oh, that's nice. that's nice, very nice. okay. now, i tell you what? could we all hold hands today? yeah, okay, yes, yes. let's all hold hands. back here, john. right--that's it, right, just come here. let's--here we go, go on. okay. dave, get that
isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. lori: baby, it's cold outside, the coldest it's been in years for many places but chicago hasn't been below zero degrees in more than 700 days. it hasn't had a inch of snow in more than 300 days. is that about to change with the cold blast moving east? janice in the fox weather center how long the sub-zero temperatures will last. >> this is old school cold, huh, ladies? i'm from canada. big puffy coats on. some places we're dealing with dangerous cold and dangerous wind chilled. air temperature combined with wind, what it feels like if you're not bundledded up and not protected. minus 23 in international falls. minus 18 in green bay. that is the windchill, the real feel temperature. that continues across the great lakes and northeast where it feels like 12 here in new york. a lot of new yorkers complaining today. minus eight what it feels like in buffalo and minus two in syracuse. windchill advisories, feels like anywhere between minus 30 and minus 50 below zero and where you see advisory, 10 to 20 below zero. it
progress at this point in time in history. >> some may still deny the overwhelming judgment of science, but none can avoid the devastating impact of raging fires and crippling drought and more powerful storms. the path towards sustainable energy sources will be long and sometimes difficult, but america cannot resist this transition. we must lead it. we cannot cede to other nations the technology that will power new jobs and new industries. we must claim its promise. >> this is not a president who is blind to the history of any given moment. today's inauguration ceremony was filled with moments of historical importance. myrlie evers williams, the widow of medgar evers became the first woman to deliver the inaugural prayer. poet richard blanco is the first latino to recite the inaugural poem, as well as the first openly gay american to perform the honor. supreme court justice sonia sotomayor became the first hispanic american to administer the oath of office when she swore in vice president joe biden. president obama spoke with these historical moments in mind during his speech. >> our j
. >> no single person can train all of the math and science teachers we need to-to-teach our children for the future. >> repeating the phrase we the people, he outlined priority autos we will rye respond to the threat of climate change. knowing that the failure to do so would detray our children and future generations. >> reaction from the seer wherea club? >> it's important time for him to be leading on this issue. >> also talked about championing gay rights. >> our journey is not complete until our gay brothers and sisters are treated like anyone uls els under the law. if we're truly created equal the love for one another must be equal as well. >> the head of the national center for lesbian rights said she was close to tear autos we felt we weren't in a back room maybe he'll talk to fuss no one is watching. >> the impact on republican who's fear any compromise to lead to a challenge from within their own ranks. saying change will depend less on president and democrats and more on moderate republican autos jeb bushes of the republican party, lamar alexander, on the podium with the pr
. the things that we have to fix are the basics. they're not hard, they're not rocket science, but we just have to achieve consensus. my optimism comes from the fact that historically america has been willing to face the hard problems, be dynamic, change things, not get stuck in gridlock. right now it's unsettling how unabler two make progress. but i thi there's an underlying optimism i have that just because of the very historical nature of this country and certainly there's no reason why we can't be competitive. you know, it's really going to be our choice in terms of how we behave, what kind of policies we set, how we work together between business and government and, you know, i'm optimistic that we'll sort it out but, boy, it sure looks ugly right now. >> susie: for more on michaelportier's research and articles go to nbr.com and check out our partnership with some of the nation's top business schools like harvard. >> tom: while beer wasn't invented in america, u.s. brewers are thinking small to make it big. small craft brewers are claiming a bigger stake of the industry's annual $300 bill
being accused early on by a science teacher and told i was using lsd and i didn't know what it was at the time. i was in the class for three months and didn't work english and the teacher didn't realize i didn't speak english and there was only 20 in the classroom and bullying can take different shapes and not paying attention and caring and while we're focusing on what kids are doing to each other, we must not ignore that sometimes adults can be part of the problem just by their behavior, even by the way they look the other way. i agree with richard 100% that we need to deal with this but zero tolerance has to be articulated in a very different way. 36% of kids that are bullied everyday report not coming to school. there is another piece that is important. as a member of the justice center we did intensive study of school discipline last year and looked at a million roashds and 60% that are disciplined incredibly more likely to drop out of school and end up in the criminal justice system and while we are working with the victims and educating we are working with all of
with muskets and militias. no single person can train all the math and science teachers will need to equip our children for the future, building the roads, networks, and research laboratories that will bring the jobs to our shores. now more than ever we must do these things together, as one nation, one people. [applause] this generation of americans has been tested by crises that steal our resolve and prove our resilience. a decade of war is ending. [applause] an economic recovery has begun. america's possibilities are limitless, for we possess all the qualities of this world but that demands. youth and driver, diversity and open this, an analyst capacity for risk -- an endless capacity for risk and a gift for reinvention. we will see that so long as we see this together. host: the editorial page from "usa today." they wrote this about president obama, saying that a decade of war is ending -- host: fred barnes, executive editor of "the weekly standard," wrote this in the opinion state -- opinion section of "the wall street journal." host: mr obama was less explicit but his emphasis was on the
't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. [ male announcer ] how do you make 70,000 trades a second... ♪ reach one customer at a time? ♪ or help doctors turn billions of bytes of shared information... ♪ into a fifth anniversary of remission? ♪ whatever your business challenge, dell has the technology and services to help you solve it. >>> on "mad money" we are searching for bull markets. not just the loud ones. the bull markets get a lot of media attention. sometimes the best bull markets are the ones that are under the radar. suddenly you look over and the stock you never heard of had a new high after a new high after a new high. i don't think anyone in the audience has thought about it. i'm talking about the market in packaging. the industry has been on fire. if you are a food company, you know that new companies can drive sales that allows the food to last longer. and in this business it comes down to two companies that you never heard of. bms, joked about to stand for buy my stock. and berry plastics group. which became public last october. ips down 5
tou more than two years.n two ye >> some may still deny theill deny overwhelming judgment of science bu but none can avoid theg impact devastating impact of raging fires and crippling drought and more powerful storms.ith 11 mil >> reporter: with 11 million illegal immigrants in america,ngress to mr. obama called on congress topr provide a legal path tohip. citizenship. >> our journey is not complete until we find a better way to welcome the striving, hopeful immigrants who still see america as a land of opportunity. until bright young students and engineers are listed in our work force rather than expelled fromm our country. >> reporter: mr. obama also recalled the newtown shootingch cause massacre which caused him to push for gun control and a polarizing fight with congress he previously avoided. journey i >> our journey is not complete until all our children-- in the streets of detroit to the hills of appalachia to the quiet lands of newtown-- know that they are in th cared for and cherished and the qui always safe from harm. >> reporter: there was one line tailored specifically fo
of science, but none can avoid the devastating impact of raging fires and crippling drought and more powerful storms. >> reporter: with 11 million illegal immigrants in america, mr. obama called on congress to provide a legal path to citizenship. >> our journey is not complete until we find a better way to welcome the striving, hopeful immigrants who still see america as a land of opportunity. until bright young students and engineers are enlisted in our worse rather than ex--- work force rather than expelled from our country. >> reporter: mr. obama also recalled the newtown shooting massacre which caused him to push for gun control and a polarizing fight with congress he had previously avoided. >> our journey is not complete until all our children from the streets of detroit to the hills of after -- appalachia to the lands of newtown know they are cherished and always safe. >> reporter: there was one line tailored specifically for a republican audience. it called to reform or eliminate an efficient -- eliminate inefficient or irrelevant government programs. th
and future generations. some may still deny the overwhelming judgment of science, but none can avoid the devastating impact of raging fires and crippling drought and more powerful storms. the path towards sustainable energy sources will be long and sometimes difficult. but america cannot resist this transition. we must lead it. >> so the question is, is this just a preview of what's to come? maybe details in the state of the union, or is this just making up for lost time? >> i think it could be a little bit of both. but we saw in that clip a real shot the president taking at republicans. when he's talking there about climate deniers. another very unusual passage in this address. also may be up first. taking a shot at your previous opponent when we talk about social security, medicare, that's not being a nation of takers, throwing in that message, i a real jab not only at mitt romney when he devoted convincingly but also paul ryan, house budget chairman, who he'll be dealing with and had made similar comments. what was interesting here was pushing climate change as the defining issue
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> thanks for staying with us, i'm bill o'reilly, continuing now with our inauguration coverage. joining us from washington juan williams. here in the studio, rare appearance in new york city mary katharine ham. what are you doing here? >> you know, the great things about americans they don't need me for the transition of power. can i hang out with you. >> were you offended by the festivities in washington? did you flee? >> i didn't flee i had a nice weekend. >> bill: you are up here in new york. did you see anything in the inauguration today. special, interesting, worthwhile. you fill in the adjective. aretha franklin's hat giant bow. there wasn't a hat like that. speech was all right. it hasn't gotten great reviews. part of it were pretty as they always are marked marketedly more liberal than he sounded last time around. he has been very good when he runs for office couching things in a centrist way. sounding very mainstream. there is less ne
, gays kamal people, the disabled. and i'm also an ira of science. found out all those things today and yet president obama said that we are a unit country. lou: we understand thaat progras are iinadequate. if we could put this out to the audience. we understand that outworn programs are inadequate to the needs of our time, we must harness new ideas and technology to remake our government. that is what will give real meaning to our ceed. in other words, the founding principles and values of the nation had no reality unless we make our government and apparently support some ideas and technology that are not even available right now. >> he hates the constitution. that's when it comes down to. we have to adapt founding principles to our changing times and needs. we must change. you know what, the constitution was written with an unchanging you of human nature in mind. the left believes it is the only thing that can change human nature on a fundamental level, corrective action. the constitution stands in the way of their grand plan to change human nature. that is why everything you hear
the overwhelming challenge of science but no one can avoid the crippling fire, droughts and more powerful storms. >> reporter: speaking on martin luther king day president obama made history by using the word gay and saying that -- the president, vice president and families at journaled for the congressional lunch before the walk . >> i'm very encouraged. >> reporter: in of the people we talked to today in the crowd said this felt like a very different experience than the inauguration four years ago. coming up we'll tell you why they said that and take you into the crowd during the inauguration and parade. >>> the inauguration also featured the first latino, the first gay and the youngest person ever to serve as the inaugural poet. >> and always one moon like a silent drum tapping on every rooftop and every window of one country, all of us facing the stars. hope. >> miami poet is the son of cuban exile. the poem was called one today and illustrated how americans share common experiences. blanco also remembered the victims of the newtown school shootings. >>> former republican presidential cand
? >> we associate utopia with science fiction, showing those visions gone wrong. we associate utopia with how we perceive communism, especially soviet communism. because utopia has been so discredited, so dragged through the mud politically, especially during the years of the cold war that anyone who speaks in that language is dismissed in one form or another. >> would you call frederick douglass utopian? barack obama utopian? >> well, frederick douglass, i imagine was like the other abolitionists, regarded as dabbling in dreams. and would have been dismissed as a dreamer, or worse, a fraud. because when his first autobiography came out, when the narrative came out, many people questioned whether he had written it himself. it was impossible that a slave could have written these words. it must have been one of his abolitionist friends, one of his white abolitionist friends. it must have been garrison, et cetera. well, it turns out that indeed, douglass wrote those words. >> do you feel the same way four years later about that moment in rochester? >> yes. absolutely. >> do you feel the
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